Skip to main content

Full text of "Announcement of the College of Medicine, the State University of Iowa"

See other formats




"WV 



IS 8 ^/"**? 



USfiVERSiTY OF 1LUH0I3 LISRARr 

FEB * 1821 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

University of Iowa 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
1898^99 



_-,-■ T 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/announcementof9899stat 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



OF THE 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



OF THE 



State University of Iowa 



IOWA CITY. IOWA 



1898^99 



Published by the University 

1898 



Calendar for 1898/99, 



Tuesday, Sept. 13th, 1898 — Entrance examination. 
Wednesday, Sept. 14th, 1898 — Session begins. 
Thursday, Dec. 22nd, 1898 — Holiday vacation begins, (evening). 
Wednesday, Jan. 4th, 1899— lectures resumed, (morning). 
Wednesday, March 29th, 1899 — Commencement. 



Medical Department, 



Faculty and Other Instructors* 



Charles Ashmead Schaeffer, A. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 

President. 

Philo Judson FarnsworTh, A. M., M. D., 

Emeritus Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

John Clinton Shrader, A. M., M. D., Uv. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, Clinical Gynecology and Diseases of 
Children. 

William Drummond Middleton, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery and Dean of the Faculty. 

Lawrence William L,ittig, A. M., M. D., M. R. C. S., 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine and 
Assistant to the Chair of Surgery. 

James Renwick Guthrie, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Physiology and Associate Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology 
and Diseases of Children. 

Elbert William Rockwood, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, Director of the Hospital, and 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

James William Dalbey, B. S., M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Charles S. Chase, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Walter L. Bierring, m. d., 

Professor of Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, and Curator of the 
Medical Museum. 

John Walter Harriman, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy. 

Martin J. Wade, LL. B., 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

Charles Moore Robertson, A. M., M. D., 

Professor of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 

William Robert Whiteis, M. S., M. D., 

Assistant Professor of Histology. 



4 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Gershom Hyde Hill, A. B., M. D., 
Lecturer on Insanity. 

Frank Thomas Breene, D. D. S., M. D., 

Lecturer on Dentistry. 

Emil Louis Boerner, Pharm. D m 

Instructor in Pharmacy. 

William Edward Barlow, A. B., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

Wilber John Teeters, B. S., Ph. C, 

Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

Lee Wallace dean, m. s., m. d., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

John Thomas McClintock, A. B., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Pathology and Bacteriology. 



William Green, 

Janitor. 



BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS, 1898, 



J. F. Clarke, M. D., Fairfield. 

J. B. Kessler, M. D., Iowa City. 

E. E. Overfield, M. D. , Elmo. 

F. S. Thomas, M. D., Council Bluffs. 

A. F. Wai/TER, M. D., Gladbrook. 

ORDER OF PUBLIC EXAMINATIONS. 



March 28th, Tuesday. 

a. Iff. 

9-10 — Materia Medica and 

Therapeutics. 
10-1 1 — Chemistry. 
1 1- 1 2 — Physiology, 
p. M. 

2-3 130— Obstetrics . 
3 130-4 130— Anatomy . 



March 28th and 29TH, 1899. 

March 29TH, Wednesday, 
a. M. 

9-10 — Practice of Medicine. 
10-1 1 — Pathology. 
n-12 — Surgery. 
P. M. 



2-5 — Faculty Meeting. 
7 130 — Commencement. 



medical alumni association, 



The annual meeting is held in the amphitheater of the Medical 
Department, at 2 o'clock p. m., on the day of Commencement. 

Every graduate of the Department is requested to send his or her 
name and address to the Secretary for enrollment. 

OFFICERS, 1898-99. 



President— Dr. M. B. Moon, Iowa City. 
Vice-President — Dr. Lizzie HESS, Iowa City. 
Secretary— Dr. S. S. 1/vTi.E, Iowa City. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



A thorough elementary preparation is required before entering on 
the course of medical lectures. The University affords a preliminary 
scientific course preparatory to the professional, and it is expected 
that many will avail themselves of this opportunity. In the branches 
of medicine there should be a thorough training in principles be- 
fore the practical portion is begun. For this purpose a careful pre- 
sentation of the subjects is made by lectures, and the knowledge fixed 
by recitations and frequent reviews. Ample means of illustration are 
used, and the materials for demonstration are abundant. In the prac- 
tical branches abundant clinical material is found to illustrate the 
subjects taught. 

The twenty-ninth annual course of lectures will begin on September 
14, 1898, and will close on March 29, 1899. There will be a holiday 
vacation commencing Thursday evening, December 22, and ending 
Wednesday morning, January 4, 1899. 

The course is divided into four years of twenty-six weeks each. It 
is the intention of the Board of Regents and the Faculty to increase 
the length of the annual course of lectures as soon as possible, and 
notice of such increase may appear in the next annual announcement. 

Medical, Surgical, Gynecological, Ophthalmological, Aural, I,aryn- 
gological and Rhinological Clinics, are held each week during the 
term. Attendance upon these is required of all students, excepting 
those engaged in laboratory work during clinic hours. 

Outline of the Plan of Instruction, 

Anatomy. 

The lectures in anatomy will be illustrated by means of specimens, 
charts, models, dissections and black-board figures. Special effort 
will be made to associate anatomical arrangement with clinical facts 
and methods of diagnosis. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 7 

During the first year the lectures will cover the subjects of osteol- 
ogy, syndesmology, the alimentary canal and associated structures, 
the vascular and respiratory systems, and the genito-urinary organs. 
These will be presented in full detail from their anatomical, mechani- 
cal and functional aspects, attention being paid to practical develop- 
mental laws and relations of viscera to surface markings and neigh- 
boring structures. 

In the second year the subjects covered during the first year will be 
carefully reviewed with additional reference to the medical and surgi- 
cal anatomy. The nervous system and the anatomy of the special 
senses will be presented in detail not only by lectures but also by 
practical demonstrations to the class divided into small sections. 

The third year will be devoted entirely to regional anatomy. The 
lectures during this year will at all times be illustrated by special dis- 
sections or surface marking upon the living subject. 

Practical Anatomy. 

The thorough study of this branch, for at least four courses, is made 
a condition of graduation. Facilities for obtaining material are such, 
under improved legislation in the State, that an abundance will 
be provided for all who may apply. The demonstrators will always 
be ready to aid and direct the prosecution of these studies. 

Upon the completion of each course of dissection, the student will 
be examined on the anatomy of the part dissected, and if the examin- 
ation be satisfactory, a certificate to that effect will be given. No 
fee is required for dissecting material. 

Physiology. 

In this subject the inductive method is very largely employed 
in imparting instruction. The lectures are profusely illustrated by 
means of charts, diagrams and blackboard figures, and the student is 
rendered practically familiar with the phenomena of the most impor- 
tant normal functions of the body by the employment of experiments 
upon living animals as a means of demonstration. Twelve lectures will 
be given in the Junior year upon applied physiology of the nervous 
system. 



8 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Chemistry and Toxicology. 

The course in chemistry extends through two years. In the first 
year the lectures are on general chemistry. The laboratory work con- 
sists, first, of analytical chemistry, including methods of testing for 
the metallic poisons, then the common medicinal substances are 
studied. The student learns methods of chemical manipulation, and 
the use of apparatus, and also becomes acquainted with the action of 
reagents and of chemicals upon each other. The course includes the 
examination of drinking water from a sanitary standpoint, each stu- 
dent making a number of analyses of various wholesome and polluted 
waters. It concludes with the methods of quantitative analysis, which 
are of the most use to the medical practitioner. 

In the second year, physiological chemistry is taken up. The lec- 
tures are in explanation and amplification of the laboratory work. The 
latter includes the study of the proximate principles of the body and 
their chemical changes. Artificial digestive experiments are made, 
their products being isolated and tested. The constituents of the 
blood are tested and the methods for the identification of stains are 
learned. The qualitative tests for the abnormal constituents of the 
urine follow, and the quantitative determination of such as are of 
importance. The course is completed by the identification of urinary 
sediments and calculi, and the analysis of various pathological speci- 
mens of urine. The lectures on toxicology treat of the physiological 
and chemical action of the principal poisons, as well as their anti- 
dotes. The methods of identifying these in food, excreta, etc., are 
explained and illustrated by experiments. 

The work in practical chemistry is conducted in the chemical labor- 
atories of the University, in which the Medical Department occupies 
rooms on the ground floor. These consist of rooms for the instructors, 
store rooms, and two large laboratories. They are well lighted and 
heated by steam. Hoods, connected with ventilating shafts, carry 
off offensive and injurious gases. The outfit is ample for demonstrat- 
ing the general principles of chemistry, as well as its application to 
medicine. Each student is supplied with a set of the necessary 
apparatus. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 9 

Histology. 

The course in histology extends through the Freshman year and 
consists of a series of two didactic lectures and four hours laboratory 
work each week. 

The histological laboratory, situated on the first floor, southeast 
corner of the Medical Building, is well lighted and thoroughly 
equipped with microscopes and all necessary apparatus for carrying 
on the work. The laboratory work comprises the preparation and 
study of microscopic slides showing the minute structure of the differ- 
ent tissues and organs of the body. The slides prepared by each 
student become his personal property. 

Instruction is given in all forms of histological technique, harden- 
ing, embedding, section-cutting, staining and preparation of material 
for examination. 

In the Freshman year the regular work in histology is preceded 
by a number of lectures and laboratory hours devoted to the study 
of general biology. 

During the Sophomore year opportunities are offered to those who 
wish to work in embryology and special histology. 



Pharmacy. 

An outline course in pharmacy is specially provided whereby the 
student may familiarize himself with pharmaceutical processes and 
the methods of preparing official preparations by actual laboratory 
practice. 

Materia Medica. 

This subject is presented during the Freshman and Sophomore 
years in progressive form. The introductory topics, such as defini- 
tions, dosage, modes and routes of administration of medicines, pre- 
scription writing, with special reference to the detection and avoidance 
of incompatibilities, will be presented at the beginning of each session 
before the classes jointly. The further consideration of the subject 
will be progressive, organic drugs being presented one session, inor- 
ganic the next. At the close of each session a test will be given cov- 



io STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

ering the ground traversed during the session. Toward the close of 
the Sophomore year the entire subject will be reviewed and a final ex- 
amination given. During the didactic lectures crude drugs will be 
presented from time to time illustrative of the subject. All official 
preparations from the same will be presented and briefly discussed 
during the course. 

Therapeutics. 

This branch of pharmacology, recognized as the distinctively scien- 
tific division of the subject, will be presented during the Sophomore 
and Junior years. Both general and special therapeutics will be outlined 
and discussed with special view to stimulate in the student a desire 
to prosecute methods of original research in the direction of studying 
the physiological action of drugs. To this end experiments will be 
made from time to time illustrative of such action upon the lower 
animals. 

Applied Therapeutics. 

In addition to the general course in therapeutics the Senior class 
is given a special course upon applied or practical therapeutics, 
to be illustrated by bedside discussion of cases in the wards of the 
University Hospital. 

Pathology and Bacteriology. 

The course in pathology and bacteriology extends through the 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior years, and is presented by means of 
didactic lectures and laboratory work. The lectures are devoted to 
bacteriology and general and special pathology, and are illustrated by 
means of drawings, preparations from the Medical museum and speci- 
mens derived from post-mortem examinations. 

The pathological and bacteriological laboratory is situated in the 
west hall on the second floor of the Medical Building. It is thoroughly 
equipped with new microscopes of the most modern type, and all 
apparatus necessary for carrying on every form of bacteriological re- 
search. Each student is provided with a table, which includes a 
microscope and all necessary staining reagents. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. n 

In the Sophomore year the lectures are confined to general pathol- 
ogy and the elementary principles of bacteriology. The laboratory 
work consists of two hours each week throughout the year, and is 
illustrative of the didactic lectures, comprising the preparation and 
study of slides showing the general pathological changes that occur 
in human tissues. An examination will be held at the close of the 
year. 

In the Junior year the lectures are devoted to the pathology of 
tumors, and the special pathology of the different organs of the 
human body. 

The laboratory work, consisting of two hours a week throughout 
the year, bears a direct relation to the lectures and comprises the 
preparation and study of slides showing the disease changes that oc- 
cur in special tissues and organs, including a complete collection of 
tumors; furthermore embodying the study of the general character- 
istics of micro-organisms, the preparation of artificial media, and the 
mounting of slides of the different organisms, with special reference 
to the pathogenic bacteria that are of great interest to medical men. 

Instruction is also given in the technique of making a post-mortem 
examination. 

A final examination in pathology will be held at the close of the 
Junior year. 

During the Senior year two hours each week are devoted to clinical 
microscopy, and advanced work in pathological histology and bac- 
teriology. 

Beginning the Thursday after Commencement, at 1:30 p. m., there 
is given a private course in practical bacteriology, which continues for 
one month. The laboratory is open daily from 9 A. m. to 6 P. M., and 
the students become familiar with all the details of bacteriological tech- 
nique. The number of participants is limited to twenty. To secure 
a place at a table $5 must be paid March 1. The rest of the fee is 
payable at the opening of the course. 

Practice of Medicine. 

The Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine combines didactic 
and clinical instruction. Many of the subjects treated in the didactic 
course find illustration in the hospital amphitheatre, and pathological 



12 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

study is facilitated by post-mortem examinations, as well as by wet 
and dry preparations from the museum. 

Medical Diagnosis. 

Recitations for the Senior class will be held each week on this sub- 
ject, the department of medical diagnosis receiving practical treatment 
here as well as at the clinic. The Sophomore class will receive prac- 
tical instruction in physical diagnosis, including the use and applica- 
tion of all the instruments and methods of precision. 

Surgery. 

Surgery is taught didactically in lectures reviewed by daily class 
quiz with recitation by advanced students on prior work, and prac- 
tically by actual surgical diagnosis and treatment of patients at the 
clinic by the members of the Senior class; also by a course of operative 
surgery for the Senior class in which all surgical operations are per- 
formed upon the cadaver. One hour each week is devoted to minor 
surgery and bandaging. 

Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

The instruction in these important subjects is complete. All modern 
means for illustration are employed, and advanced students are 
carefully trained in the principal obstetric operations. 

Ophthalmology. 

The instruction in this branch combines didactic and clinical 
teaching. One lecture a week is given in the anatomy, physiology 
and pathology of the region involved, and the Wednesday clinic is 
devoted to the diagnosis and treatment of its diseases. A large num- 
ber of cases appear at these clinics, and a great many operations of 
all kinds are performed. 

Otology, Rhinology and laryngology. 

The instruction in these branches is given by didactic and clinical 
teaching, one lecture and one clinic being given each week. Much 
attention is directed to the methods of examination and treatment of 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 13 

cases. The car, nose and throat clinic being large it enables students 
U) become familiar with the use of instruments, all being allowed to 
treat patients under the supervision of the instructor. It is the aim 
of the course to familiarize each student with the normal as well as the 
pathological conditions of the several organs. The clinic room has 
been especially fitted up for the work and is in itself complete. 

Medical Jurisprudence. 

The essentials, to the practitioner, of this important department of 
medicine will be fully treated. 

Insanity. 

This subject is discussed as concisely as possible, with the special 
needs of the general practitioner constantly in view, and material ap- 
pearing at the clinics from time to time, during the term, is utilized 
in illustration. A course of lectures on this subject will be de- 
livered during the latter part of January. 

Sanitary Science and Public Hygiene. 

One lecture a week will be delivered on matters pertaining to sani- 
tary science and public hygiene. 

Clinics. 

The clinics have been well and abundantly supplied with material. 
The patronage of the hospital is such that a variety of cases is pre- 
sented for operation and treatment. The hospital is open for the re- 
ception of patients during the entire year. 

Every case is fully utilized as a means of instruction by a system of 
examination in which advanced students are required to diagnosticate 
disease and suggest treatment, before the class, subject to the correc- 
tion of the clinical teacher. 

Clinical Patients. 

Medical cases should be referred to Professor L,. W. Iyittig; surgical 
cases to Professor W. D. Middleton; gynecological cases to Professor 
J. C. Shrader; eye cases to Professor J. W. Dalbey; ear, nose and throat 
cases to Professor CM. Robertson. 



14 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Medical Museum. 

The museum contains a large and interesting collection of morbid 
and other specimens, furnishing valuable aid to instruction in its 
large amount of material illustrative of pathological and normal con- 
ditions. This is constantly drawn upon as a means of demonstration. 

Physicians are earnestly requested to send to the curator any speci- 
mens of healthy, morbid, or comparative anatomy. For all such 
favors due credit will be given by labeling the specimens with the 
name of the donor before placing them in the museum. 

Medical library . 

The Ranney Memorial Medical Library, consisting of a large num- 
ber of works especially devoted to insanity and mental diseases, is 
open for consultation, together with a well selected list of books on 
general medical subjects to which are added each year the latest 
works and the latest editions. The library is supplied with the cur- 
rent medical journals, and will be open every day of the session. 
Medical students have also the privilege of drawing books from the 
general library of the University. 



OUTLINE OP THE COURSE. 



Freshman Year. 



LECTURES AND RECITATIONS, EACH WEEK. 

Anatomy — Four lectures; one recitation. 
Physiology — Three lectures; one recitation. 
General Chemistry — Three lectures; one recitation. 
Materia Medica — organic— Two lectures; one recitation. 
Histology — Two lectures; one recitation. 
Laboratory work for the session as follows: 
Chemistry — One hundred and sixty hours. 
Biology and Histology — One hundred hours. 
Bandaging — Twenty hours. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 15 

Dissecting — Two courses. 

Final examination in General Chemistry, Histology and Pharmacy, 
also, examination (not final) in Physiology, Anatomy and Materia 
Medica. 

Sophomore Year. 



LECTURES AND RECITATIONS, EACH WEEK. 

Anatomy — Four lectures; one recitation before holidays, two after 
holidays. 

Physiology — Three lectures; one recitation before holidays, two 
after holidays. 

Physiological Chemistry — Two lectures. 

General Pathology and Bacteriology — Two lectures. 

Materia Medica — Organic: two lectures; one recitation. Inorganic: 
one lecture until holidays. 

Therapeutics — One lecture after holidays. 

Obstetrics — Two lectures. 

Physical Diagnosis — One hour. 

Hygiene — One hour. 

Pharmacy — Ten lectures during the session. 

Laboratory work for the term as follows: 

Physiological Chemistry — Sixty hours. 

General Pathology — Fifty hours. 

Dissecting — Two courses. 

Pharmacy — Thirty hours. 

Embryology — Optional. 

General University clinics, when not otherwise engaged. 

Final examination in Anatomy, Physiological Chemistry, Physiol- 
ogy, Materia Medica and General Pathology. 

Junior Year. 



LECTURES, RECITATIONS AND CLINICS, EACH WEEK. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine— Five lectures; one recitation. 
Surgery — Three lectures; one recitation. 
Pathology — Two lectures; one recitation. 



16 state; university OF IOWA. 

Therapeutics — Two lectures. 

Obstetrics — Two lectures; one recitation. 

Gynecology — Two lectures; one recitation. 

Toxicology — One lecture. 

Applied Anatomy: Medical, Surgical and Nervous — One lecture. 

Applied Physiology of the Nervous System — Twelve lectures during 
the session. 

General Medical, Surgical, Gynecological and Ophthalmological 
Clinics— Seven hours. 

Laboratory work for the term as follows: 

Pathology — Fifty-two hours. 

Bacteriology — Twenty-six hours. 

Pinal examinations in Obstetrics, Therapeutics and Special Pathol- 
ogy. 

Senior Year. 



LECTURES, RECITATIONS AND CUNICS, EACH WEEK. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine — Five lectures; one recitation. 

Surgery — Three lectures; one recitation. 

Practical Therapeutics — One hour until the holidays. 

Gynecology — Two lectures; one recitation. 

Ophthalmology — One lecture. 

Otology, Rhinology and laryngology — One lecture. 

Dermatology — One lecture after holidays. 

Paediatrics — One lecture after holidays. 

Operative Surgery — Twelve hours during the session. 

Operative Obstetrics — Twelve hours during the session. 

Medical Jurisprudence — Twelve lectures during the session. 

Dentistry — Five lectures during the session. 

Insanity — Twelve lectures during the session. 

General Medical, Surgical, Gynecological, Ophthalmological, Aural, 
Rhinological and Laryngological Clinics — Seven hours. 

Laboratory work: 

Clinical Microscopy — Two hours a week. 

Final examination in Practice of Medicine, Surgery, Gynecology, 
Ophthalmology, Ear, Nose and Throat. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



'7 



The following is a specimen programme: 







FRESHMAN 


YEAR. 






Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesd'y 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


3 to 9 


BANDAG- 
ING 

Sec. i. 


CHEMIS- 
TRY 


ANATOMY 


MATERIA 
MEDICA 


HISTOLOGY 


ANATOMY 


9 to io 




PHYSIOL- 
OGY 


ANATOMY 

CHEMIS- 
TRY 




ANATOMY 

Recitation 








10 to II 


CHEMIS- 
TRY 

HISTOLOGY 


PHYSIOL- 
OLOGY 


10 to II 

Bandaging 

Sec. 2. 


II to 12 


ANATOMY 


MATERIA 
MEDICA 


CHEMIS- 
TRY 

Recitation 




10 to 12 

Hist. Lab. 

Sec. 2. 


I to 2 


i to 3 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sec. i. 


1 to 4 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sec. 1. 

PHYSIOL- 
OGY. 

PHYSIOL- 
OGY 

Recitation 


1:30 to 3:30 

Histol'gic'l 

Laboratory 

Sec. 2. 


1:30 to 3:30 

Histol'gic'l 

Laboratory 

Sec. 1. 


1 to 3:30 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sec. 2. 

1 to 3 

Hist. Lab'y 

Sec. 1. 




2 to 3 




3 to 4 


3 to 5:30 

Chemical 

Laboratory 

Sec. 2. 




3:30 to 5:30 
Chemical 
Laboratory 




3:30 to 5:30 

Chemical 

Laboratory 




4 to 5 










5 to 6 











SOPHOMORE 


YEAR. 






Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 

ANATOMY 

OBSTET- 
RICS 


Wednesd'y 

OBSTET- 
RICS 

PHYSIOL- 
OGY 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8 to 9 


ANATOMY 

Recitation 

PHYSIO- 
LOGICAL 
CH'MISTRY 


MATERIA 
MEDICA 




8:30 to II 
Physiologi- 
cal 
Chemistry 


9 to 10 


PHARMACY 


PHYSIO- 
LOGICAL 
CH'MISTRY 


10 to II 


HYGIENE 


PHYSIOL- 
OGY 




PHYSICAL 
DIAGNOSIS 


ANATOMY 


Sec. 2. 


11 to 12 


ANATOMY 


PHYSIOL- 
OGY 

Recitaiion 


MATERIA 
MEDICA 


ANATOMY 




General 

PATHOL- 
OGY 




1 to 3 
Pathologi- 
cal 
Laboratory 


1:30 to 3:30 
Gynaeco- 
logical 
Clinic 


1 to 3:30 
Physiologi- 
cal 
Chemistry. 
Laboratory 

Sec. 1. 










1:30 to 4 

Surgical 

Clinic 


1:30 to 3 
Medical 
Clinic 




2 to 3 












3 to 4 








4 to 5 




PHYSIOL- 
OGY 


Inorganic 

MATERIA 
MEDICA 









IS 



STATE) UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesd'y 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8 to 9 




PATHOLOGY 


OBSTETRICS 


SURGERY 


PATHOLOGY 


8 to io 
Pathologi- 
cal 
Laboratory 


9 to io 




OBSTETRICS 




THERAPEU- 
TICS 


SURGERY 


io to II 


io to 12 
Pathologi- 
cal 
Laboratory 




THERAPEU- i 

TJCS SURGERY 




PRACTICE 


II tO 12 








TOXICOLOGY 


PRACTICE 

Recitation 

















I tO 2 


1:30 to 2:30 

PRACTICE 


1:30 to 3:30 
Gynaeco- 
logical 
Clinic 


1:30 to 3:30 
Eye 
Clinic 


1 130 to 4 

Surgical 

Clinic 


1:30 to 3 
Medical 
Clinic 








2 to 3 












3 to 4 


GYNAECOLOGY 




PRACTICE 










PATHOLOGY 

Recitation 




4 to 5 


GYNECOL- 
OGY 

Recitation 












1 





SENIOR YEAR. 



Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesd'y 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8 to 9 


8 to 10 
Pathologi- 
cal 
Laboratory 

Sec. 1. 


PATHOLOGY 


OBSTETRICS 


SURGERY 


PATHOLOGY 


8 to 10 
Pathologi- 
cal 
Laboratory 

Sec. 2. 


9 to 10 


OBSTETRICS 


OPHTHAL- 
MOLOGY 


THERAPEU- 
TICS 


SURGERY 


10 to II 


10 to 12 
Pathologi- 


10 tO 12 

Pathologi- 
cal 
Laboratory 
Sec. 1. 


THERAPEU- 
TICS 


SURGERY 


LARYNGOL- 
OGY and 

RHINOLOGY 


PRACTICE 


Laboratory 
11 to 12 Sec . 2 _ 








PRACTICE 

Recitation 



2 to 3 


3 to 4 


4 to 5 



5 to 6 



1:30 to 2:30 

PRACTICE 1:30 tO 3:30 

Gynaeco- 
logical 
Clinic 



GYNECOL- 
OGY 

GYNECOL- 
OGY 

Recitation 



PATHOLOGY 

Recitation 



1:30 to 3:30 

Eye 

Clinic 



3:30104:30 

PRACTICE 



1:30 to 4 

Surgical 

Clinic 



SURGERY 

Recitation 



1:30 to 3 
Medical 
Clinic 



MEDICAL 
DIAGNOSIS 



4 to 6 

Ear, 

Throat 

and Nose 

Clinic 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 19 

Text-Books and Books of Reference. 

The following are recommended by the Faculty: 

Medical Dictionary — Gould, Duane, Dunglison. 

Anatomy — Gray, Quain, Morris, Treve's Surgical Applied Anatomy . 

Dissectors — Holden. Heath, Ellis. 

Comparative Anatomy — Wiedersheim, Jeffery Bell, Howell. 

Physiology — Landois and Stirling, Foster, Flint, Kirk. 

General Chemistry — Simon, Witthaus, Roscoe and Schorlemmer. 

Urine Analysis — Purdy, Neubauer and Vogel, Black. 

Toxicology — Wormley, Taylor, Woodman and Tidy. 

Surgery— Park, American Text-Book of Surgery, Roberts, Wyeth, 
Gerster, Stimson on Fractures and Dislocations, Wharton's Minor 
Surgery and Bandaging, MacDonald. 

Pathology — Ziegler, Thoma, Delafield and Prudden, Green. 

Bacteriology— Abbot, McFarland, Crookshank, Sternberg. 

Practice of Medicine— Tyson, Wood and Fitz, Osier, Strumpel, 
American Text- Book of Theory and Practice of Medicine, Roberts, 
Flint, Bartholow, Loomis. 

Medical Diagnosis — Vierordt, Musser, DaCosta, Flint. 

Obstetrics— American Text-Book of Obstetrics, Lusk, Davis, Par- 
vin, Irishman, Playfair, King, Dorland. 

Obstetric Surgery — Grandin and Jarmin. 

Embryology— Minot, Manton. 

Gynecology — Skene, Thomas and Munde, Garrigues, American 
Text-Book, Pozzi, Davenport, May's Manual, Clinical Gynecology, 
Keating and Coe. 

Materia Medica — White and Wilcox, Potter, Bartholow. 

Therapeutics — Hare, H. C. Wood, Potter, Farquharson. 

Diseases of Children— Starr's American Text-Book, J. Iv. Smith, 
Goodhart. 

Medical Jurisprudence — McClellan's Civil Malpractice, Wharton 
and Stille, Beck, Elwell. 

Histology — Stoehr, Piersol, Schafer, Stirling. 

Ophthalmology — Fuchs, Juler, Noyes, Nettleship on the Eye. 

Otology, Laryngology and Rhinology — Burnette, MacBride, Bos 
worth, Roosa, Buck, Politzer, Sajous, Browne. 



20 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Insanity — Lewis' Text-Book of Mental Diseases, Stearn, Clouston's 
Mental Disease. 

Dermatology — Jamison, Hyde, Duhring, Crocker. 

Hygiene and Sanitary Science — Wilson, Rohe, Buck. 

The first book mentioned in the foregoing list is recommended for 
preliminary reading, with the exception of chemistry. In this, 
Remsen's Introduction to the Study of Chemistry is recommended. 

Text-books and books of reference can be obtained at an average 
cost per volume of from $3.00 to $5-00, or $15.00 to $20.00 per year. 

It is of far greater advantage to the student, during the college 
course, to study and review a single text-book in each department 
than to read several cursorily. It is, therefore, advised that a single 
work, in each department recommended above, be chosen and care- 
fully studied, while any other may be used for reference and subse- 
quent perusal. The first one of each of the above lists is preferred. 

Tuition. 

The fee for tuition is $65.00 for each year, of which $40.00 is payable 
at the opening of the term, and the balance on or before January 10. 
All fees must be paid when due to the Secretary of the University, 
William J. Haddock, and .students who do not pay these when due 
will be suspended from the Department until payment has been made. 

In the combined course the fees are $25.00 for each of the first two 
years and $75.00 for each of the last four years of the course. Stu- 
dents entering the Medical Department from schools of pharmacy, 
dentistry, or veterinary medicine with advanced standing will pay 
$10.00 for dissecting material used in making up deficiencies in this 
branch. For students taking a partial course the fees are $10.00 per 
year for each branch except dissecting where the fee is $15.00. 

There are no extra fees whatever, but for each laboratory course in 
chemistry, also for that in practical pharmacy, there is required a de- 
posit of $3.00 to cover breakage and to insure the return of all keys at 
the close of the session. This sum (breakage, if any, deducted) is 
returned to the student on presentation of the certificate of the pro- 
fessor in charge of the laboratory in question. 

The above statement is now in effect, and will be understood to 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 21 

apply to all students in the Department, entirely irrespective of the 
date of matriculation. 

Alumni of this Department will be admitted to lectures and clinics 
free of charge, but will pay the usual laboratory fees. Graduates of 
other colleges which are recognized by this Department will be ad- 
mitted to full lecture privileges upon paying the matriculation fee and 
a fee of $10.00 with the usual laboratory fees. The laboratory fee is 
$5.00 for each practical course. 

A certificate of attendance will be issued to each student at the close 
of the session. 

Students upon arrival will apply for all needed information to the 
Secretary, Dr. E. W. Rockwood. 



Requirements for Admission. 

1. Credible certificate of good moral character signed by two phy- 
sicians of good standing in the state from which the applicant comes. 

2. Graduates or matriculates of respectable colleges or graduates 
of high schools of the first grade, or of normal schools established by 
state authority, may be admitted without examination upon presenta- 
tion of satisfactory credentials, provided, that in each case, at least 
one year of Latin has been included in the course. All candidates 
for admission must present their credentials or apply for a permit for 
examination at the office of the President of the University not later 
than noon of Tuesday, September 13, 1898. 

Examination for admission will embrace the subjects usually taught 
in the high schools of Iowa, including one year's Latin, which subject 
may, however, be made up before entering upon the second year's 
course. In September, 1898, those who have no diploma will be ex- 
amined in Latin (one year), Physics (one year), English, U. S. His- 
tory, Arithmetic, Algebra through Quadratics, plane and solid Geom- 
etry and Botany or some other science. 

3. Students entering from other medical schools with advanced 
standing must be examined as stated above. 

This school is a member of the Association of American Medical 
Colleges, and adheres to the requirements of that Association. 



22 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Combined Scientific and Medical Course. 

Arrangements have recently been made with the Faculty of the 
Collegiate Department by which it will be possible for a student to 
complete the course in Science and the course in the Medical Depart- 
ment in six years, thereby obtaining the degrees B. S. and M. D. 
This combined course is especially recommended to all students who 
intend to enter the profession of medicine. 



COMBINED COURSE READING TO THE DEGREES 
OF B. S. AND M. D. 

(Subjects printed in italics are to be taken in the Collegiate Depart- 
ment. ) 

First Year. 

German, 5, or Latin, 4 or 5.* 
Mathematics, 5. 
Drawing or History, 2. 
English, 3. 
Military Drill, 3. 

Second Year. 

German, 3, and English, 2\ or German, 3, and Economics, 2; or 
Latin, 5; or Greek, 5. 
Physics, 5. 

Animal Morphology and Physiology, 5; or Systematic Zoology, 5. 
Military Drill, 3. 

Third Year. 

French, 5; or Greek, 5; or Latin, 5. (At least one year of Latin re- 
quired. 

Animal Morphology and Physiology, 5. 
Chemistry, 5. 

Botany (fall and winter) and Histology (spring), 5. 
Anatomy (fall and winter) and Dissection (spring), 4. 
Military Drill, 3. 



*The figures refer to the number of exercises a week. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 23 

Fourth Year. 

Anatomy, 5. 

Physiology, 4. 

Physiological Chemistry, 2, with laboratory work. 

General Pathology, 2. 

Mateiia Medica, 3. 

Obstetrics, 2. 

Physical Diagnosis, 1. 

Bandaging, 1. 

Pharmacy, 40 hours. 

Dissecting when possible. 

Embryology and Bacteriology (spring). 

Clinics when not otherwise engaged. 

Fifth Year. 

Junior Medical, with eledives in the spring term. 

Sixth Year. 

Senior Medical, with eledives in the spring term. 

Advanced Standing. 

Students from other accredited medical colleges who have attended 
one course of lectures, will be admitted to the Sophomore class upon 
passing an examination in the branches taught during the first year. 

Those who have attended two courses will be admitted to the 
Junior class upon passing an examination in the branches taught dur 
ing the first and second years. 

Those who have attended three courses will be admitted to the 
Senior class upon passing an examination in the branches taught dur- 
ing the first, second, and third years. 

Graduates in Pharmacy, upon examination as above, may enter the 
Sophomore class. 

Graduates of Dental schools in good standing, will be admitted to 
the Sophomore class upon passing the entrance examination only. 

Graduates from Veterinary colleges in good standing, will be 
admitted to the Sophomore class upon passing the entrance examina- 
tion. 

Those entering the Sophomore year from Pharmacy, Dental, or 



24 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

Veterinary schools must at the close of the year pass examinations in 
all branches of the Freshman year not previously pursued by them, 
and must have completed the work required of the Sophomore class 
in the dissection of the human subject. 

In all cases those who enter from other schools with advanced 
standing must comply with the requirements for admission, page 21. 

Requirements for Graduation. 

i. The candidate must be twenty-one years of age. 

2. He must be known to be of unexceptionable moral character. 

3. The time of study must include attendance upon at least four 
full courses of lectures, the last of which must be taken in this insti- 
tution. The time occupied by each of the four courses of lectures shall 
not be less than six months of twenty-six weeks, and not more than 
one of the four courses shall be within the same year. 

4. The candidate must have satisfactorily completed at least four 
courses in Practical Anatomy. 

5. The deportment during the term must have been unexception- 
able. 

6. Attendance upon all lectures, clinics and other instruction in 
the course must have been in accordance with the requirements of the 
department. 

7. All members of the Freshman class will be examined in General 
Chemistry, Histology, Physiology, Anatomy and Materia Medica at 
the end of that year. The examination in General Chemistry and 
Histology will be final should the student show the required profic- 
iency. 

8. Members of the Sophomore class at the end of that year must 
pass satisfactory examinations in Anatomy, Physiology, Physiological 
Chemistry, General Pathology, Materia Medica and Pharmacy. 

9. Members of the Junior class will be given a final examination 
at the end of the year in Obstetrics, Therapeutics and Special Patho- 
logy. 

In case of failure to pass any of these examinations, the stu- 
dent may be re-examined at the opening of the next session. If he 
fail in this second examination, he will be allowed to present him- 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 25 

self for re-examination only after attendance upon another course of 
lectures. 

Students of the Senior class must notify the Secretary of the Faculty 
in writing, during the second week in February, of their intention of 
becoming applicants for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, at the same 
time presenting a certificate of legal age and of good moral character, 
also the receipts from the Secretary of the University, showing that 
all fees have been paid. 

During the last week of the term, having complied with the other 
requirements, they must pass a satisfactory examination in Practice 
of Medicine, Surgery , Ophthalmology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, 
Ear, Nose and Throat and in any other subjects taught, if so directed 
by the Faculty at the beginning of the term. 

Class standing, recitation marks, together with demonstrators' 
reports and final examinations, will be taken into consideration when 
determining the candidate's fitness to receive the medical degree. 

Medical Building. 

The Medical Building is located on the south end of the campus, 
in a line with the other University buildings. It is one of the best 
and most commodious medical college buildings in the west. It com- 
prises a basement for general purposes, the first floor containing the 
Secretary's office, the professors' rooms, the histological laboratory, 
the medical library and reading room, a lecture room and the janitor's 
room. 

On the second floor is a spacious and well-lighted pathological and 
bacteriological laboratory supplied with a sufficient number of micro- 
scopes for class-work and with other appliances, prosector's room, 
and general Faculty room, and a large amphitheatre provided with 
opera chairs for two hundred and sixty-six students. 

The whole of the third floor (80x36 feet) used as a dissecting 
room, is supplied with sinks and water, and each table is lighted with 
gas. 

The whole building is heated with steam and is well ventilated. 



26 STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 

University Hospital. 

The Twenty-sixth General Assembly levied a tax for the erection of 
new buildings for the University, and by the action of the Board of 
Regents the first year's tax, somewhat more than fifty thousand 
dollars has been devoted to the building and equipment of a 
Hospital which was opened for the reception of patients in January, 
1898. The University Hospital is in all respects modern and without 
a superior in the west. With an administration building thoroughly 
furnished, with large and commodious wards as well as private rooms, 
with a clinical amphitheatre that will comfortably seat two hundred 
or more, and with separate surgical, gynecological, medical, ophthal- 
mological and laryngological operating rooms together with a well 
supplied Free Dispensary open throughout the year, but little is left 
to be desired. 

It is confidently believed that the students who make the Medical 
Department of the University the school of their choice will find in 
all its departments complete and perfect equipment, both for didactic 
and illustrative instruction. 

University Training School for Nurses. 

Connected with the Medical Department of the University, the 
School for Nurses offers a three years' course to women who desire to 
enter the profession of nursing. The course comprises theoretical 
work in class, practical work in wards, and a complete course in 
invalid cookery. lectures will be given by members of the Medical 
Faculty, and the Superintendent upon Anatomy, Physiology, Materia 
Medica, Chemistry of Foods and Nutrition, Bacteriology, Obstetrics, 
Gynecology, Diseases of Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat, Diseases of 
Children, Bandaging, Medical, Surgical, and Obstetrical Nursing. 

Candidates may be admitted when vacancies occur. For further 
information application should be made to the Superintendent, Miss 
Jennie S. Cottle, University Hospital. 

Resident Physicians. 

Appointments as Resident Physicians in State and other insti- 
tutions are made each year from the graduates of the Medical 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 27 

Department. These are awarded to such of the applicants as the 
Faculty judges best prepared for the position, the successful candidates 
being allowed to select, in the order of their rank, from those posi- 
tions which are available. 

In March, 1898, the following named graduates were appointed: 
Dr. Charles E. Wright, Mercy Hospital, Davenport. 
Dr. Francis A. Ely, University Hospital. 



Board in Iowa City can be obtained for from $2.00 to $3.00 a week; 
rooms from $2.00 to $8.00 a month. Many students procure rooms 
and board in clubs, which materially reduces the cost. 

Necessary Yearly Expenses. 

Tuition fee, which includes all University charges 

except laboratory breakage $ 65 $ 65 

Breakage 1 to 2 

Room rent, 6 months 12 to 48 

Board, 26 weeks 52 to 78 

Fuel and light 6 to 15 

Books 12 to 20 

Total $148 to #228 



Graduates of this school are requested to acquaint the Secretary of 
the Faculty immediately with their postoffice addresses, and to inform 
him promptly of any change of residence. 

For any further information address Dr. E. W. Rockwood, Secretary 
of the Medical Faculty, Iowa City, Iowa. 



GRADUATES, MARCH 1898, 



Abegg, Henry Hervy 
Adams, Fred L. 
Allen, Frank Hervy 
Anderson, Frederick Eugene 
Arent, Asaph 
Besore, Walter McKay 
Bean, Oley G. 
Blake, Charles Wesley 
Bossingham, Ottmer N. 
Bowen, Jesse William 
Briggs, Walter Homer 
Campbell, Charles Harvey 
Detchon, Hugh Smith 
Ely, Francis Argyle 
Engle, Harry Perry 
Farrell, Albert Martin 
Fitz, George G. 
Frank, George W. 
Fuchs, Adele M. 
Habenicht, Robert H. 
Hoxie, Will E. 
Hull, John Franklin 
Jorgensen, Palle Peder Marius 
Kearney, Charles Atwell 
Knudson, Becker Christian 



Lambert, Fred Ernest 
Lester, Harry Sumner 
McClintock, John Thomas 
Mcintosh, J. Drusie 
Mecum, John Warren 
Mereness, Herbert Dayton 
Morgans, Samuel Lewis 
Moulton, Milo Willie 
Nass, Hildus Augustinus O. 
Noe, Charles Fred 
Parker, Ralph H. 
Parker, William Gilman 
Pence, Lawrence Waldo 
Purcell, Bert E. 
Replogle, Jerry A. 
Rogers, Claude Bernard 
Sackett, Claude Conwell 
Snyder, John Franklin 
Stover, Emery Ellsworth 
Thielen, Michael H. 
Thornton, Albert Herrick 
Walker, Frederick Earl 
Walker, James C. 
Willsey, Frank Brown 
Wright, Charles Edward 



MATRICULANTS, 



SENIOR CI/ASS. 



NAME. RESIDENCE. 


PRECEPTOR. 


Abegg, Henry Hervy 


Iowa. 


A. K. Berry. 


Adams, Fred L. 


« i 


A. J. Morgan. 


Allen, Frank Hervy 


<< 


G. H. Cassidy. 


Anderson, Frederick Eugene 


< t 


W. D. Middleton. 


Arent, Asaph 


" 


Francis E. Seymour. 


Besore, Walter McKay 


<< 


J. E. Conn. 


Bean, Oley G. 


<< 


S. J. Nelson. 


Blake, Charles Wesley 


(< 


W. M. Young. 


Bossingham, Ottmer N., D. V. M. 


11 


A. Beane. 


Bowen, Jesse William 


< i 


L,. W. Uttig. 


Briggs, Walter Homer, B. Did., 


11 


Faculty. 


Campbell, Charles Harvey 


Nebraska. 


S. O. Whaley. 


Detchon, Hugh Smith 


Iowa. 


A. R. Leath. 


Ely, Francis Argyle 


D 


. D. and R. R. Davisson. 


Engle, Harry Perry 


(< 


Perry Engle. 


Farrell, Albert Martin 


i< 


F. E. Seymour. 


Fitz, George G. 


ti 


Faculty. 


Frank, George W. 


u 


Charles Burwald. 


Fuchs, Adele Matilda 


(( 


Agnes Eichelberger. 


Gardner, John Raphal 


<< 


Faculty. 


Gilkes, William 


(C 


Faculty. 


Habenicht, Robert H. 


(( 


Faculty. 


Hoxie, Will E. 


" D.G. 


Hoxie & J. W. Harriman, 


Hull, John Franklin 


" 


J. C. Shrader. 


Jorgensen, Palle Peder Marius 


t < 


James Murphy. 


Kearney, Charles Atwell 


(« 


A.;H. Blocklinger. 


Knudson, Becker Christian 


t< 


R. J. Nestor. 



3o 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



Lambert, Fred Ernest 




A. J. Hobson. 


Lester, Harry Sumner 


" 


Faculty. 


McClintock, John Thomas, B. A. 


" 


R. E. Conniff. 


Mcintosh, J. Drusie 


" 


A. D. King. 


Mecum, John Warren, 


Wisconsin. 


Faculty. 


Mereness, Herbert Dayton 


Iowa. 


C. Brown. 


Morgan, Samuel Lewis 


" 


M. H. Waplis. 


Moulton, Milo Willie 


" 


A. M. Avery. 


Nass, Hildus Augustinus O. 


< < 


E. H. Williams. 


Neely, Abner Dale 


i< 


Faculty. 


Noe, Charles Fred 


(C 


C. J. Winzenried. 


Parker, Ralph H. 


" 


P. J. Barry. 


Parker, William Oilman 


Oregon. A. W. and C. S. Bowman. 


Pence, Lawrence Waldo, B. Did. 


Iowa. 


N. W. Phillips. 


Purcell, Bert 


" C. S. Chase and H. P. Duffield. 


Replogle, Jerry Allan 


" 


Faculty. 


Richards, James Weldin 


" 


J. W. Morgan. 


Rogers, Claude Bernard 


" 


R. A. Rogers. 


Sackett, Claude Conwell 


" 


A. K. Berry. 


Snyder, John Franklin 


" 


S. R. Cook. 


Stover, Emery Ellsworth 


" 


A. Folsorn. 


Stull, Will H. 


" 


Faculty. 


Thielen, Michael H., M. Did. 


< i 


Faculty. 


Thornton, Albert H. 


" 


W. W. Beam. 


Walker, James C. 


" 


Faculty. 


Walker, Frederick Earl 


" 


J. L. Augustine. 


Willsey, Frank Brown 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Wright, Charles Edward 


Iowa. 


C. C. Smead. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


PRECEPTOR 


lacy, Otto E. 


Iowa. 


J. P. Mullin. 


igworth, Harry S. 


" 


H. W. Sigworth, 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



31 



SOPHOMORE CI,ASS. 



NAM)-:. 


residence;. 


PRECEPTOR. 


Adams, Ortus Fuller 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Alfoni, Edward True, Ph. G. 


" 


C. S. Chase. 


Anderson, Mannie Florine, D. D. S. " 


Faculty. 


Augustine, Grant 


" 


J. L. Augustine. 


Bachman, Morris Piper 


tt 


J. L. Heries. 


Barker, James Archie, B. Did. 


" 


C. C. Heady. 


Binford, William Sherwood 


" 


G. W. Padgham. 


Bowes, John Joseph 


" 


F. J. Will. 


Bright, Henry F. 


(i 


C. E. Leithead. 


Brown, Hadley Cyprian 


<< 


I. C. Brown. 


Clark, Orson Whitney 


<< 


O. Clarke. 


Cook, Jesse Lee 


(« 


F. E. Cook. 


Cooper, Dean Gordon, D. V. S 


Iowa. 


F. H. Farrington. 


Copeland, John Albert 


" 


J. B. Kessler. 


Corsaut, James Col van 


< i 


W. S. Burrows. 


Creel, James Cleon 


" 


J. W. Lander. 


Deters, Willie August 


Minnesota. 


Faculty. 


Dotson, Eli E. 


Iowa. 


J. K. Milbourne. 


Freeman, John Peter 


(< 


C. A. Hurd. 


George, Abel Benson 


< t 


A. Carson. 


Gray, Howard D. 


<< 


P. Engle. 


Greenlee, Clyde Vernie 


" 


D. D. Drennan, 


Henderson, Archibald G. 


< t 


Faculty. 


Hildreth, Herman Lee 


J. 


E. and E. L. Gilmore, 


Hohenschuh, Frank Adam 


<< 


Faculty. 


Hollenbeck, Hubert Lewis 


<( 


L. J. Adair. 


Ickes, Lawrence James 


" 


A. W. Bowman. 


Johnson, George Monroe, Ph. 


B. 


G. O. Johnson. 


Lamerton, William Edward 


" 


F. Horton. 


Lenz, Joseph Alvin, Ph. G. 


" 


Faculty. 


Luehrsmann, Barney 


<« 


Faculty. 


McFall, Edward Angustus 


(< 


Faculty. 


Martin, Ernest Edwin 


<( 


Faculty. 


Meis, Edward William 


11 


N. J. A. Mueller. 



32 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


PRECEPTOR. 


Meyhaus, John Henry 


Iowa. 


A. D. Hageboeck. 


Morris, Thomas Boyd, Ph. B. 


( ( 


Faculty. 


Neff, Mary Lawson, A. B. 


" 


Faculty. 


Newell, William Carl 


<< 


W. Abegg. 


Osborn, Claude Fenton 


" 


Faculty. 


Ostrom, Louis, Jr., A. B. 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Patterson, William Edward 


Iowa. 


Jas. Murphy. 


Payne, Rollo 0. 


<< 


Faculty. 


Reiter, Alfred E. 


<< 


H. F. Steinle. 


Rice, Perry Flint 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Roberts, Ernest Eugene 


Iowa. 


J. W. Lander. 


Sargent, Frank Loring, Ph. G. 


" 


G. E. Fullerton. 


Sears, George L. 


" 


Faculty. 


Sig worth, Fred Byers 


< < 


H. W. Sigworth. 


Sloan, Arthur Neely 


<< 


R. E. Conniff. 


Smith, Ralph Thaddeus 


<< 


M. N. McNaughton 


Stuart, Percy Ernest 


( c 


A. W. Adair. 


Thompson, James Raymond 


(< 


C. B. Allen. 


Tilden, Charles George 


" 


W. E. Harriman. 


Torney, Samuel James, M. Did. 


il 


Faculty. 


Van Gorden, Jesse Iceland 


" 


J. C. Da vies. 


Wagner, George Alexander 


" 


M. M. Meredith. 


Weir, Edward C. 


" 


A. Weaver. 


Wells, Seth M. 


(< 


Faculty. 


Williams, Edward B., M. Did. 


" 


Faculty. 


Wright, Charles Alfred 


" 


J. R. Sifton. 


York, Nathan Albert 


(< 


Faculty. 



FRESHMAN CI,ASS. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


PRECEPTOR, 


Ainsworth, Willard Charles 


Iowa. 


E. W. Haradon. 


Beach, Lena Alice 


" 


Faculty. 


Beach, Melville Augustus 


<t 


Faculty. 


Belsheim, Andrew Gilbert 


" 


G. G. Belsheim. 


Bennett, Henry Sumner 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



33 



NAMK. 


RESIDENCE. 


PRECEPTOR. 


Blackmore, Ralph Davis 


Iowa. 


E. L. Blackmore. 


Brundage, Myron 


(t 


Faculty. 


Bullock, William Elmer 


11 


G. H. Cassidy. 


Cantouwine, Eutellus Augustus South Dakota 


. Faculty. 


Cantwell, John Dalzell 


Iowa. 


A. W. Cantwell. 


Cook, James Orlando 


Illinois. 


W. 0. Beam. 


Chapman, Henry S. 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Cretzmeyer, Charles H. 


<< 


W. A. Rohlf. 


Daly, Maud 


11 


Faculty. 


DeLespinasse, Adolph Frederick H. " 


J. F. DeLespinasse. 


Dennert, Frank 


" 


J. R. Guthrie. 


Denney, Alden Ray 


u 


Faculty. 


Donohoe, Anthony P. 


«i 


Jas. Murphy. 


Ekblad, William, A. B. 


Kansas. 


Faculty. 


Fairchild, Reuben Joel 


Illinois. 


J. S. Whitmire. 


Fitzpatrick, Dennis Francis 


Iowa. 


Jas. Murphy. 


Frank, Carl Schurtz 


•■ 


J. C. Wilson. 


Gifford, Andrew James 


South Dakota. 


W. H. Lane. 


Gaines, Daniel 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Gorham, Amy Margaret 


Minnesota. 


Faculty. 


Hall, Elmo Allen 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Harlan, Charles D. 


11 


J. C. Williams. 


Heilman, Ernest Samuel 


(i 


E. C. Heilman. 


Hender, Alfred Baker 


<( 


W. D. Middleton. 


Hess, William Clarence 


<• 


Faculty. 


Hews, Lewis DeWitt 


<< 


R. H. Hews. 


Hibbs, Fred Valentine 


•■ 


W. W. Chatterton. 


Hobbs, Samuel Warren, Ph. B. 


" 


Faculty. 


Hobby, Edwin Elmer 


«< 


C. M. Hobby. 


Jarvis, Fred Jackson 


it 


Faculty. 


Johnson, Frank George 


11 


M. B. Coltrane. 


Kemmerer, Theodore Wilbert 


" 


C. T. Kemmerer. 


Kenner, Joseph J. 


Missouri. 


S. M. Green. 


Krejsa, Oldrich 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Laughead, John Samuel 


11 


W. W. Syp. 


Lofgren, Emil 


Illinois. B. C 


, and S. L- Anderson. 



^A 



STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


PRECEPTOR. 


Logan, Fred Wallace 


Iowa. 


E. E. Munger. 


Logan, Jay Augustus 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Long, Henry Shively 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Long, Ulysses Preston 


<( 


Faculty. 


Love well, John Hubert 


Missouri. 


Faculty. 


Lowry, James David 


Iowa. 


R. Evans. 


Luckey, George Miller, B. A. 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


McCall, Harry Kenyon 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Meadows, Lawrence Harland 


<« 


Faculty. 


Meigs, Benjamin Lyle 


"W.A 


. Chapman and C. V. Artz. 


Middleton, Edward Duncan 


11 


W. D. Middleton. 


Middleton, George McClellan 


" 


W. D. Middleton. 


Morgan, Charles Henry 


" 


A. W. Adair. 


Morton, Lewis Burrows 


<< 


W. M. Morton. 


Overholser, John D. 


" 


Faculty. 


Peterson, August John 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Pence, Roy "William 


(i 


Faculty. 


Plumer, Lee Elmer 


" 


Faculty. 


Pringle, Jesse 


« 


L. A. Rogers. 


Puleston, Fred 


<< 


A. G. Hejinian. 


Ramsey, Guy 


ti 


Jas. Murphy. 


Rentz, Charles Bernard 


• < 


E. A. Doty. 


Ridenour, Joseph Elmer 


(< 


Faculty. 


Sailor, Edwin Allen 


" 


Faculty. 


Schultze, Frederick Pitte 


Iowa. W. C. 


Schultze and E. F. Clapp, 


Schroeder, William 


" 


J. F. McCarthy. 


Sears, Edwin 


Illinois. 


Faculty. 


Shaw, Robert H. 


<( 


Chas. Lanning. 


Sheldon, Benjamin L. 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Smith, Lizzie 


" 


Faculty. 


Starr, Charles Freeman 


<< 


Faculty. 


Stober, Alvin Martin 


<< 


Faculty. 


Speers, Will Frederick 


«< 


C. C. Griffin. 


Stanley, Clarence J., B. S. 


" 


J. S. Love. 


Wescott, Leroy Anderson, M. 


Did. " 


A. F. Walters. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



35 



NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


PRECEPTOR, 


Wheat, Fred Calwell 


Iowa. 


Faculty. 


Wright, Howard Jesse 


« < 


Faculty. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



NAME. 

Habenicht, Ida Adella 

Mason, Walter Milton 

Teeters, Wilber John, B. S., Ph. C. 

Tourtellot, Lewis Jamison 



RESIDENCE. 
Iowa. 



Resume. 

Freshmen 78 

Sophomores 61 

Juniors 2 

Seniors 55 

Special Students 4 

Total 200 



THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 



BOARD OF REGENTS. 
His Excellency, I,ESUE M. SHAW, Governor of the State. 

RICHARD C. BARRETT, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Shirley Gilulland, Glenwood. W. R. Moninger, Galvin. 
Hiram K. Evans, Corydon. J. D. McClEary, Indianola. 

WmiAM D. TisdalE, Ottumwa. J. W. Garner, Columbus Junction. 
Alonzo Abernethy, Osage. Parker K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Harvey Ingham, Algona. Charles E. Pickett, Waterloo. 

George W. Cable, Davenport. 



The University, as the head of the school system of the State, was 
provided for by a statute enacted by the First General Assembly in 
February, 1847, in accordance with the Constitution of the State 
adopted in the previous year. As at present organized, the University 
comprises the following departments: 

THE COI,I,EGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

Students are admitted to this department from most of the high 
schools of the State without examination. The curriculum embraces 
four general courses of study, the Classical, two Philosophical, and the 
general Scientific; and two technical courses, the course in Civil Engi- 
neering, and the course in Electrical Engineering. 

The Board of Regents has accepted plans for an additional building 
for this department to be erected at a cost of $150,000. 

There is no preparatory school connected with this department. 
During the year 1897-98 there were fifty-one professors and assist- 
ants engaged in the work of instruction in this department, and the 
number of students enrolled was six hundred and seventy-four. 



THE UW DEPARTMENT. 

The course in this department extends over two years of nine 
months each, and on its completion the degree LX,. B. is conferred. 

During the past year instruction was given by five resident profes- 
sors, who spend their entire time in that work, and by four lecturers 
of distinction in the various branches of law. 

The number of students enrolled in 1897-98 was two hundred and 
twenty-seven. 

THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The course in this department requires four sessions of six months 
each, and on its completion the graduates receive the degree M. D., 
and are entitled to registration by the State Board of Medical Exam- 
iners. 

During the year 1897-98 instruction was given by twenty-one pro- 
fessors and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was two 
hundred. 

THE HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAI, DEPARTMENT. 

Four sessions of six months each are required for graduation, when 
the degree M. D., is conferred, and the graduates are entitled to regis- 
tration by the State Board of Medical Examiners. 

During the year 1897-98, instruction was given by twenty professors 
and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was sixty-five. 



THE DENTAX, DEPARTMENT. 

The full course requires attendance during three sessions of nine 
months each. On the completion of the course the degree D. D. S., 
is conferred, and the graduates are entitled to registration by the 
State Board of Examiners. 

During the year 1897-98, instruction was given by twenty-two pro- 
fessors and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was one 
hundred and forty-eight. 



THE PHARMACY DEPARTMENT. 

The course in this department comprises two sessions of six months 
each. On its completion the degree Ph. G., is conferred. 

During the year 1897-98, instruction was given by nine professors 
and assistants, and the number of students enrolled was thirty-six. 



The total number of different students in all departments of the 
University during the year 1897-98 was over thirteen hundred. 

The University is well supplied with laboratories and apparatus. 
Among the former may be mentioned the Chemical Laboratory, 
recently erected at an expense of $50,000, in which building is also 
located the Pharmacy Laboratory; the Physical Laboratory; Labora- 
tories for Animal Morphology and Physiology; the Histological Lab- 
oratory; the Botonical Laboratory; the Psychological Laboratory; the 
Pathological Laboratory; the Engineering Laboratories; the Dental 
Laboratories. 

The Museum of Natural History contains large collections of speci- 
mens which are used in the work of instruction in Geology, in 
Zoology, in Botany, etc. 

In 1897 the University lost by fire more than 25,000 volumes, but 
the libraries now contain over 16,000 volumes, and the 27th General 
Assembly passed an act levying a special tax for the rehabilitation 
of the general library. This tax will make about $55,000 available 
for this purpose. New books will be purchased at once. 

For further information as to any of the Departments address, 

CHARGES A. SCHAEFFER, 

President of the University 



3 0112 105745597